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Traveler claims Regina hotel wrongly charged her $800 for allegedly damaging her room

Traveler claims Regina hotel wrongly charged her 0 for allegedly damaging her room

Carly Folden spent a quiet December weekend in Regina with her 13-year-old son, who was competing in a local hockey tournament. She was then fined $800 for damaging a hotel room, which she claimed she did not cause.

She and her son stayed at the Residence Inn Regina, a Marriott hotel within walking distance of the rink where he played. On December 13, three days after checking out, she received an email saying she had been charged for breaking the lock on her room. Folden denies causing any damage.

“It was like a punch in the gut,” Folden said.

CBC repeatedly contacted Residence Inn by Marriott and Marriott International for comment on this story. The hotel accepted the request but did not respond.

CBC has reviewed emails Folden received from the hotel.

The email informing her of the accusation, signed by Residence Inn Regina general manager Cari Lemieux, states that an inspection of the room after Folden had checked out found that the lock had damage “beyond repair.”

Another email included an image of a door jam with arrows and circles indicating chips along the door.

“It looked as if someone had broken the lock with a crowbar. It’s not like I carry a crowbar in my purse or anything like that,” Folden said.

“(It) clearly showed damage to the lock, but it didn’t show the room number or anything like that.”

The Residence Inn sent this photo to Carly Folden to illustrate the damage they believe they caused and were charged for.The Residence Inn sent this photo to Carly Folden to illustrate the damage they believe they caused and were charged for.

The Residence Inn sent this photo to Carly Folden to illustrate the damage they believe they caused and were charged for.

The Residence Inn sent this photo to Carly Folden to illustrate the damage he believed she caused and was billed for. (Provided by Carly Folden)

Folden said she tried to get her money back in several ways: using a lawyer, the Better Business Bureau and Marriott. She said Marriott offered her points or a $100 Marriott gift card, but she didn’t find those offers sufficient.

She also disputed the charge with her credit card company. About a month and a half later, she was informed that her dispute had been resolved and her credit card company had refunded her money.

“I will certainly never stay there again and I will make sure that all my people that I know in sports and business know this story because it is not fair,” she said.

WATCH | Woman claims Regina hotel charged false credit card for $800:

Dawn Minnaar, senior data recovery analyst at MyChargeBack, works with people disputing transactions.

She said a hotel cannot charge a customer for a new transaction without his consent, which means it must tell him he wants to charge for the damage and ask if he accepts, rather than telling him he has already been charged.

If the client refuses, it could lead to a lawsuit.

Minnaar said litigants, like in a court case, must present evidence.

Minnaar said allegations of false allegations are more common than you might think, although some people don’t know they can contest the allegations or simply don’t have the strength anymore.

Folden isn’t the only one who claims the Residence Inn Regina wrongly accused them of damage they didn’t cause.

Dawson Barlage, a volunteer assistant coach for the U13 hockey team, said he stayed at the hotel in January for a tournament.

He said that on his first morning at the hotel, he turned on the TV and noticed that it was cracked and that green and purple stripes were appearing on the screen. He said he reported it to the front desk, who claimed she had broken it and told him he would have to pay $800 for it.

“If I mess up, I admit it,” he said.

He said that his team’s manager had taken care of the matter and he did not have to pay the fee he quoted.