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The doctor shares his experience in helping Alabama teenagers

‘She was coming in and out of consciousness’: Doctor shares experience in helping Mountain Brook teen after shark attack

TODAY IT IS IN CRITICAL CONDITION. NEW AT TEN. WE LISTEN TO ONE OF THE PEOPLE WHO HELPED GRIFFIN IN THE MOMENT RIGHT AFTER THIS ATTACK. TWO DOCTORS WHO WERE ON THE SAME BEACH rushed into action when they realized what was happening. WVTM 13 JARVIS ROBERTSON LIVE LOCAL. AFTER TALKING TO AN ORANGE BEACH DOCTOR WHO SAYS THAT IT’S A TRUE MIRACLE AND THAT THEY COULD HELP. YES, DOCTOR RYAN FORBUS SAYS THAT THE TEENAGERS she lost in and out of consciousness as they tried to save her life now he practices family medicine on a regular day. BUT WHEN THE TRAUMA APPEARED, HE HAD NO PROBLEMS JOINING TO ACTION THROUGH FORMAL TRAINING. NOW IT’S REALLY A MIRACLE THAT TWO DOCTORS, A NURSE AND AN EMT PLAYED A KEY ROLE AT THIS CRITICAL MOMENT. EVERY YEAR WE GO ON HOLIDAY TO ROSEMARY WITH FAMILY. THIS IS SAYING DOCTOR RYAN FORBES. He was boarding a BOOGIE in the ocean with his son and suddenly everyone heard a commotion about 30 yards away. AND I SAW PEOPLE GETTING OUT OF THE WATER QUICKLY. AND WHEN I WAS RUNNING TO THE SHIELD, I LOOKED TO THE LEFT AND I SAW, Hmm, WE SEE BLOODY IN THE WATER, ONE OF HIS BEST FRIENDS, WHO IS ALSO A DOCTOR, WAS THERE WITH HIS FAMILY, WHEN THEY GOT TO FORBES HE SAW THEIR CHILDREN COMING OUT OF THE WATER, SOMEONE WAS CARRYING OUT FROM THE WATER TEEN MOUNTAIN BROOK TO LIVE NEAR THE BEACH. FOR A LONG TIME. I’VE NEVER SEEN A SHARK ATTACK. So, I mean, a lot of times you’re just, you know, mentally going through your ABCS, your airway, your blood circulation, trying to control these things that, YOU KNOW, YOU LEARNED BEFORE DURING TRAUMA, BUT THAT DIDNT STOP HIM FROM STARTING TO HELP . Once they got her ashore, they could, you know, start getting the tourniquet ready, get her, um, the base of the bleeding to stop and basically, um, just provide care until the first responders get there. FORBES SAYS HIS FRIEND, DOCTOR MUHAMMAD ALI, LIVES IN JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI AND PRACTICES INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY. It was definitely a godsend that he could be there and help because anyone can control bleeding. I THINK DOCTOR ALI IS PROBABLY A GOOD MAN TO DO THIS, HE SAYS. THIS WAS A CASE WHERE EVERYONE HAD TO BE IN THE RIGHT PLACE AT THE RIGHT TIME TO HELP SAVE A LIVE. I THINK IT’S IN HUMAN NATURE THAT WE LIKE TO TAKE CARE OF OURSELVES AND I THINK THAT’S what we have in common. AND TO BE HONEST WITH YOU, I THINK MAYBE GOD WAS PROVIDING US A LITTLE BIT BECAUSE HOW OFTEN WILL YOU HAVE A TRAUMA NURSE OR AN INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGIST OR A FAMILY DOCTOR? AND WE EVEN HAD ANESTHESIOLOGY THERE IF THEY NEEDED AN AIRWAY. You had the Grady Trauma team ready. IT HAPPENED TO BE THERE. NOW DOCTOR FORBES SAID HE HAD THE CHANCE TO SPEAK TO THE TEEN’S FAMILY. HE ALSO WISHES THEM GOOD LUCK. LIVE COVERAGE ON MAGIC CITY TODAY.

‘She was coming in and out of consciousness’: Doctor shares experience in helping Mountain Brook teen after shark attack

Two Mountain Brook teenagers are still recovering from a brutal shark attack at Rosemary Beach in Walton County, Florida. The Birmingham area and nearby communities offer their support to girls.Dr. Ryan Forbess has a family medicine practice in Orange Beach, and his friend Dr. Mohommad Ali is an interventional radiologist in Jackson, Mississippi. When it happened last week, their families were on vacation. The two men were spending time in the ocean with their children when they heard a commotion happening near them. Suddenly people ran out of the water. Forbess told WVTM 13’s Jarvis Robertson that he quickly pulled his son from the water to be safe. When he returned to the shore, he turned around and saw bloody water. >> WHAT WE KNOW: Shark attacks on the Persian Gulf Coast There was panic and screams, but there were also brave men and women ready to answer the call of someone in need. Fifteen-year-old Lulu Gribbin wasn’t doing well at the moment, but that didn’t stop passersby from doing what they knew. “We were able to start getting tourniquets ready and stop the bleeding,” Forbess said. . “Basically, I provide care until emergency services arrive.” Trauma is not his everyday life. However, his formal training undoubtedly made a difference. “You mentally go through your ABCs: airway, blood circulation, and try to control those things that you learned earlier from the injury,” Forbess said. Along with a doctor from Alabama and his radiologist friend, there happened to be a trauma nurse and a paramedic there to help. “They were all just random people on vacation, we all jumped in together. It was just amazing,” Forbess said. >> SHARK SAFETY: How to keep yourself and your loved ones safe Gribbin suffered serious injuries to one upper limb and one lower limb, both requiring the use of tourniquets. She was airlifted to Ascension Sacred Heart Pensacola, where she remains in critical condition. She later lost her left arm and part of her right leg. The other teenager, McCray Faust, suffered a “superficial wound” to his right foot. On Saturday, South Walton Fire District Beach Safety Director David Vaughn told CNN that the person who suffered minor injuries had been released from the hospital.

Two Mountain Brook teenagers are still recovering from a brutal shark attack at Rosemary Beach in Walton County, Florida. The Birmingham area and surrounding communities offer their support to girls.

Dr. Ryan Forbess practices family medicine in Orange Beach, and his friend Dr. Mohommad Ali is an interventional radiologist in Jackson, Mississippi. When it happened last week, their families were on vacation.

The two men were spending time in the ocean with their children when they heard a commotion happening near them. Suddenly people ran out of the water.

Forbess told WVTM 13’s Jarvis Robertson that he quickly pulled his son from the water to be safe. When he returned to the shore, he turned around and saw bloody water.

>> WHAT WE KNOW: Shark attacks on the Gulf Coast

There was panic and screams, but there were also brave men and women ready to answer the call of someone in need.

Fifteen-year-old Lulu Gribbin wasn’t looking good at the moment, but that didn’t stop bystanders from doing what they knew.

“We were able to start getting tourniquets ready and stop the bleeding,” Forbess said. “I basically provide care until emergency services arrive.”

Trauma is not his everyday life. However, his formal training undoubtedly made a difference.

“You mentally go through your ABCs: airway, blood circulation, and try to control those things that you learned earlier in the trauma,” Forbess said.

As it happened, along with the Alabama doctor and his radiologist friend, there was a trauma nurse and a paramedic helping out.

“They were all just random people on vacation, we all jumped in together. It was just amazing,” Forbess said.

>> SHARK SAFETY: How to keep yourself and your loved ones safe

Gribbin suffered serious injuries to one upper limb and one lower limb, both requiring the use of tourniquets. She was airlifted to Ascension Sacred Heart Pensacola, where she remains in critical condition. She later lost her left arm and part of her right leg.

The other teenager, McCray Faust, suffered a “superficial wound” to her right foot. On Saturday, South Walton Fire District Beach Safety Director David Vaughn told CNN that the person who suffered minor injuries had been released from the hospital.